Hunger In Africa Essay

On By In 1

PREVENT LAND GRABBING

An ugly side of current scares over future food supply is wealthy, land-poor states, like those in the Gulf and South Korea, acquiring tracts of undeveloped countries to use as allotments. It is a campaigning cause of the multi-charity IF campaign against hunger. Ethiopia, Sudan, Madagascar and Cambodia have been targeted and a total area the size of Spain may already have been acquired.

Problem: Hard to police. Difficult to distinguish between genuine investment in Africa and the expropriation of land from the poor who need it to grow their food. Chances: 3/10

BLOCK THE SPECULATORS

Huge sums of investment fund money have flooded into the commodities markets since the financial crisis, looking for returns no longer available in equities. Automated trading systems that exploit tiny flaws in the market and encourage volatility make it impossible for traditional traders to keep prices stable and hedge against spikes.

Problem: Much discussed in the G20 and G8, an international agreement on reforming and regulating the commodities markets looks no nearer than when the problem was first identified. Banks and investors have marshalled strong arguments against interference. Chances: 3/10

PRODUCE LESS BIOFUEL

The pressure to achieve targets on reduced carbon emissions from fossil fuel has seen rich countries turning sugar, maize and other food crops into ethanol and biodiesel.

Problems: Many economists doubt how important this issue really is in food price rises. Food and fuel prices are inextricably linked, so producing biofuel may lower food prices. A proportion of food crops have always been used for energy – 100 years ago 10% of the world's grain went to feeding horses. Second-generation biofuels won't use food crops, but wood, stalks and other waste. Chances: 1/10

STOP THE MEAT FEAST

Meat production is a wasteful use of the planet's limited resources – even today, 40% of grain crops are going to feed livestock and fish. It is most inefficient with intensive beef farming, where it has been shown that just 2.5% of the feed given to cattle emerges as calories for our consumption.

That is why the UN says agricultural production will have to rise 60% to feed the extra 2 billion mouths in 2050.

Problems: There is no international mechanism to regulate or alter collective human diets, and no models other than famine that have ever worked. Chances: 0/10

SUPPORT SMALL FARMERS

Most African farmers are less productive than a US farmer was 100 years ago. There is a consensus between NGOs and governments that supporting and training small farmers is the best possible solution to future food security. A combination of aid, education in low-tech methods such as better rice planting and irrigation, and the introduction of better seeds and fertilizer could spark a green revolution in Africa, such as the one that transformed South Asia in the 20th century.

Problem: Rich countries have proved poor at delivering on their aid pledges. Genetically modified crops are already part of these schemes.

Chances: 8/10

TARGET INFANT NUTRITION

"Eliminating malnutrition is achievable. It's within our reach," Bill Gates told the London summit, and many companies and rich nations are backing an African government-led plan to tackle it. Big improvements have already been made. The solution lies in education on good feeding techniques and getting the right nutrients to the mother and child from the beginning of pregnancy. Overall, malnutrition makes people poorer – it is responsible for an 11% decline in GDP in affected countries.

Problem: Critics say it diverts policy makers' attention from the job of solving the systemic problems in food supply.

Chances: 9/10

ROLL OUT BIOTECH

Huge gains could be available for health and agricultural productivity if the promises of genetic modification can be believed. Gene-splicing crops to help them withstand drought and flood may be vital. Pigs and chickens could have their digestive systems altered so that they eat food not required by humans, and pollute the environment less.

Problem: There are risks with the technology, and no satisfactory regulatory system in place. Public distaste at the idea of GM, especially in Europe, is holding up research and stopping investment. Safer ideas, like stem cell meat fed on algae, are still far from production. Chances: 6/10

REDUCE POVERTY

Economic growth has long been seen as the key to reducing hunger. More trade, financial liberalisation and open markets should aid the flow of food, of which there's no overall shortage. Successful poverty reduction in China has led some economists to predict there will be no more hungry people there by 2020.

Problems: Not easy to organise, with the west in economic recession and aid spending falling. More importantly, economic growth does not necessarily trickle down to the hungry poor.Child malnutrition has increased in India during the past decade despite the country's boom.

Chances: 2/10

Famine In Africa Essay

Famine in Africa

Famine has struck parts of Africa several times during the 20th century, and to this day is still going strong. According to the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization, the average African consumes 2300 kcal/day, less than the global average of 2700 kcal/day. Recent figures estimate that 316 million Africans, or approximately 35 percent of the continent's total population, is undernourished. Although hunger in Africa is hardly new, it now occurs in a world that has more than enough food to feed all its citizens. Moreover, while Africa's population is growing rapidly, it still has ample fertile land for growing food. Hunger therefore reflects not absolute food scarcity but rather people's lack of access to resources—whether at the individual, house-hold, comunity, or national leve that are needed to produce or purchase adequate food supplies. The reasons people cannot obtain enough food are: several different historical patterns of in equality. These patterns include the in equalities between Africa and its former colonisers or contemporary financiers, and between Africa's rich and poor. It also includes in equality between members of the same households, where food and the resources needed to obtain it (such as land and income) are often unevenly distributed between men and women, old and young. Whatever the reasons for food deprivation, when the result is malnutrition it can do damage, increasing diseases such as malaria, rickets, anemia, and perhaps acquired immune deficiency syndrome aka AIDS Mal-nourished children suffer stunted growth and, often, learning problems. Malnourished adults have less energy to work. Over the long term, inadequate nourishment can cast communities into a cycle of sicknes, under production, and poverty.
Famine is commonly defined as "acute starvation associated with a sharp increase in mortality." Famine in africa is not an abrupt event, nor an immediate, inevitable outcome of drought or other climatic misfortunes. Rather, research on the history of famine shows that several factors typically contribute to a societys or regions vulnerability to starvation, and that some of the causes of famine have changed significantly over the past century.
Some basic facts are: 1st, it is mostly children who die, followed by men; women's greater biological stamina makes them most likely to survive prolonged food deprivation. 2nd, the primary cause of death is not starvation itself, but diseases such as diarrheal infection and malaria. 3rD, famine not only increases mortality rates but also decreases fertility—that means it will make birthrates go down. 4rd, famine is typically rural, because for Africa's leaders food security in politically influential cities has almost always taken priority over rural areas. 5th the reported mortality rates from contemporary African famines are inaccurate, due partly to the difficulties of collecting such information, but also to international...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Famine In Ethiopia Essay

1017 words - 4 pages Not all human-beings are as fortunate as others. People all over Africa are suffering from famine and dying from it. One country in particular stands above all the rest looking back in history. Ethiopia, formerly known as Abyssinia in 3000 BC, when it became the first African nation, has hit its bottom and cannot get any worse. Famine, hunger, fear, and hopelessness are all emotions running through the average Ethiopian. The latest string of...

SUDAN CASE STUDY DROUGHT

488 words - 2 pages The civil war and the drought have been main reason for famine in the Sudan.The physical factor:Long-term decline of rainfall in Southern Sudan.Increased Rainfall VariabilityIncrease use of marginal land leading to degradingFloodingSocial FactorsThere is a high population, which is linked to use of marginal land due to erosion. Also...

The Bittersweet Effects of the British Empire on India and Africa

1738 words - 7 pages Christopher North once said, “The sun never sets on the British Empire.” This famous quote is the perfect description of how the British Empire covered such a wide variety of areas in the world that there was always going to be a place that the sun was shining on that which the British inhabited. The British began to expand and colonize, like the Europeans started to do into the sixteenth century, in the seventeenth century. The British Empire...

Recent famines across Africa have prompted the questions of why Africa, and why again? Focus on these questions by analysing the situation of food insecurity and underlying causes.

5951 words - 24 pages The recent famines witnessed across southern, and more recently eastern Africa have revived international attention to the pressing questions of why Africa and why again? It is the very focus of this essay to address these questions through analysing the situation of food insecurity in Africa and the underlying 'causes', but also to question, through comparison to other 'major world regions' the assumption that Africa is experiencing the worst...

Child Soldiers Speech

770 words - 3 pages Child Soldiers SpeechWest Africa has many "third world" countries. Since medieval times there has been a lack of food and bad climate. Plenty of the population of West Africa is farmers. Because of droughts they suffer from famine and lack of money. In...

British Impact on Imperialism

1081 words - 4 pages Meredith EnrightMr. RileyHonors World History19 March 2014British Impact on African ImperialismGreat Britain is known for the empire it built in the 19 th century. But what were the driving forces behind their expansion across the globe? It wasn't all about economics and money. The English felt they were taking on a moral role in assuming the "burden" of changing Africa into a...

Poverty in Ethiopia

1758 words - 7 pages Poverty in EthiopiaEthiopia is a nation located in North East Africa, and a source of most of its financial woes is the fact it is a landlocked nation. To reach any ports, Ethiopia must negotiate with other nations. Most of their port negotiations are done with the bordering nation, Eritrea, which is also the cause of a lot of armed conflict. As far as demographics are concerned, it is home to seventy one million...

Description of the desertification crisis in Africa

956 words - 4 pages Controlling the DesertChanging the makeup of a continent’s lands can be devastating for the people that live there. The threat of famine because of a different climate that in unable to yield the amount of food necessary for the people to maintain their populations is one of the greatest problems associated with those sorts of changes. When a land once vital for people to feed their families begins to turn into desert, the people of the...

William Kamkwamba: The Boy Who Harnessed the Hearts of the World

1292 words - 5 pages In 2009 one young man changed the lives of thousands by telling his story of hardship, survival and innovation to the world. The book, "The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind" by William Kamkwamba reveals in great detail the complete blindness that our western society possesses regarding the truth of life on the continent of Africa. As citizens of the western world we have a tendency to see only the statistics and politics of the wars, famines and...

Aids in South africa

1352 words - 5 pages IN A Time of Need"Everyday lost is a day in when 10,000 more people become infected with AID." - Kofi AnnanSeventeen million people are dead. Twenty-five million more have the same death sentence hanging over their heads. An entire continent is held captive by the fear of this killing machine. By the year 2010 life expectancy on this continent will have plummeted to the levels found at the beginning of the last century. This...

Nkosi Sikelel' Africa: A Song Made More Popular by the Government's Banning

1404 words - 6 pages The music from the Apartheid in South Africa was extremely important in the movement for freedom. At a time when there wasn’t much money for the Anti-Apartheid Movement, music became the most important weapon. The songs sung all over South Africa in resistance to the Apartheid intimidated the government more than weapons and violence could because of the powerful meaning behind each song that unified and strengthened the resistance. Artists...

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *